Why More Seniors Should Become Truck Drivers

Truck Driver

Why More Seniors Should Become Truck Drivers

Truck drivers are the backbone of the American economy. They ensure all goods and services are delivered on time and with guaranteed quality. However, in a study published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the transportation industry lost 6% of its pre-pandemic labor force of 1.52 million workers, as reported by Yahoo News. To combat the shortages, freight carriers are now paying their drivers a record high compared to years past.  Now, more than ever, there is no better time to become a truck driver. This is especially true for seniors looking for a high-paying job or extra spending money in retirement. Below are several reasons seniors should consider jumping into the lucrative profession of truck driving. 

Seniors Have Fewer Obligations and More Free Time

One of the most significant factors deterring people age 30-50 from becoming truck drivers is the desire to have a career allowing more family time. Long hours on the road and extensive traveling often keeps parents, typically fathers, away from their family for extended periods. Conversely, most seniors do not have young children. They do not have the responsibility of packing school lunches, attending soccer practice, and driving carpool. Instead, the children of seniors are typically full-grown, and often have children of their own. Consequently, seniors ultimately have fewer obligations, and therefore have more free time on their hands, and what better way to spend it than by making a little extra cash. 

High Earning Potential

As of 2021, approximately 15 million older adults age 65+ were reported living below the federal poverty level, according to the National Council on Aging.  These numbers represent roughly a staggering 13 percent of the total senior population in America. Senior citizens are particularly vulnerable to poverty because of their lack of income and social security benefits. They also have more difficulty finding jobs due to changes in technology and fewer employers willing to hire them. Truck drivers make an average of 67K per year, according to Indeed. The average salary of a full-time employee in America (40 hours per week) is 53K, which is substantially less than a truck driver. 

It’s Easy to Enter the Workforce

Typically, high-earning jobs require additional education, such as a Masters’s or Doctorate Degree. For many seniors, the desire to go back to school and spend thousands of dollars on a degree simply does not make sense financially nor time-wise. Intriguingly, obtaining a Commercial Drivers License (CDL) is quite easy! You have to pass a vision test, knowledge exam, pre-trip inspection, and several other criteria. However, you are not required to go back to school, making it easy to jump right into the trucking workforce. 

You Get to See the Country

If you are a senior with the burning itch for adventure, the places you’ll see while being a truck driver can’t be matched. The sights and sounds of the open road will take you to endless landmarks across the country it would usually take a lifetime to experience, from the Rocky Mountains, Bayou swamps, Grand Canyon, and beyond. What’s best, you’ll be getting paid to travel! As a senior, it is your mission to practice active aging, meaning reward yourself in your golden years. 

You are Helping Society

We don’t usually think of truck drivers as synonymous with humanitarians or social workers, but the reality is due to the shortage of truck drivers in America, getting supplies on time to distributors is more critical than ever. Imagine a world without wood at hardware stores, computers missing from Best Buy, and empty racks at Costco. It doesn’t sound fun, right? As seniors enter their golden years, they feel a strong obligation to give back to society. Already in the second half of their lives, they’ve had ample time to know what they wish to change about the world intimately. By choosing to shift your career in the trucking industry, you are making a difference, one freight load at a time!

Conclusion 

The need for truck drivers is growing. With the increasing demand, it’s a great time to be in this lucrative industry! Truck driving can be an excellent path back into the workforce and one that will continue to grow as Americans age. As baby boomers retire, more opportunities are available for those who want to work and get out of the house. And once they get behind the wheel, seniors may find themselves happier than ever because they’re doing something meaningful by adding to the American economy and traveling throughout this great nation. At Outsource Financial Services, we work with freight companies throughout the country. If you are looking for factoring services to help with cash flow, please contact us today.